One Piece Odyssey’s RPG approach should be more common for anime games

On March 28, a A play News: The COO Online News feed has appeared to give fans clues about the immediate future of A play. While the anime is currently on hiatus due to a cyber attack on Toei Animation, there is still plenty of activity in the franchise. The Wano arc has reached what may be its ultimate manga climax, with many reveals rushing to meet avid readers. A new movie called One Piece Movie: Red is in development, with a slow drip of designs and details coming out. Netflix live action A play The series has begun filming and appears to be adapting the very beginning of the series with Shanks.

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There were a few other products featured during the stream. One was the One Piece Card Game, with five games revealed alongside a few individual cards. Of much greater interest to the gaming crowd, however, was One Piece Odyssey. It’s next A play title is coming to consoles and PC, and it takes A play games in a whole new direction. While there will still be exploration due to the Straw Hat Pirates being stranded on a new island, the gameplay will be that of a traditional JRPG. Information released so far implies it will be turn-based A play game, which is a massive departure not just for the Seafaring franchise, but for licensed Shonen Jump games as a whole.


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Why becoming a JRPG is a big deal for One Piece


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When you think of a licensed anime game, certain genres come to mind. Historically, games made from Shonen Jump or comparable shonen franchises have tended to be action games or fighting games. There’s a good amount of variety in these, but they tend to be budget titles. Flashy visuals and faithful recreations take priority over deep and satisfying gameplay, with only a few like Dragon Ball Fighter Z succeed in reversing the trend.

Arena fighters have become particularly prevalent due to the lack of design, and therefore budget, expectations of a traditional fighter. There are definitely some gems in this rough, including the latest Naruto Ultimate Ninja Storm payments and Dragon Ball Xenoverse titles, but that doesn’t matter much when fans are tired of seeing them.


Traditional RPGs are not unheard of, but they are very rare. Most shonen RPGs are made for handhelds, and in recent years they’ve been rare. A play and dragonball were two of the first Shonen Jump franchises to embrace RPG gameplay, though not with great success. Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to eradicate the Saiyans and several of From TV Animation – One Piece games incorporated RPG mechanics, but were forgettable compared to mainstream JRPGs like dragon quest Where Final Fantasy. Successful JRPG adaptations are rare, however Bleach: The Third Phantom is a standout example on the DS. One Piece Odyssey is of a rare breed, but not unwelcome.


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How The JRPG Pivot Could Work For One Piece Odyssey


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Details are scarce at this time, but it looks like One Piece Odyssey stands out from other turn-based anime games mainly because of its scope. Players will be able to control most known Straw Hats in and out of battle, and can explore the new corner of A play‘s world they find themselves in. Unlike the recent Fairy tale JRPG by Atelier studio Gust, Odyssey does not need to adapt its home series events and may have a bigger budget to start. It might end up looking like Dragon Quest 11, being a standard but solid JRPG. In a sea of ​​mediocrity A play games, without FighterZ equivalent in sight, fans can celebrate.


This comes down to the scope of the game, which can be larger than that of the standard licensed JRPG. Yes A play is processed at a AAA budget and made comparable to a dragon questthen her gender-switching can do her even more good than a decent combat system. A play and RPGs share many traits, such as large worlds, relatively large casts, and plenty of treasure and danger around every turn.

While the kinetic action A play is known to be hidden in some cutscenes and combat animations, both the characters and the setting will have room to breathe. The opportunity to explore thoroughly One Piece Odyssey‘s Island and its inhabitants might leave a far more lasting impression on fans than any other arena fighter.

One Piece Odyssey should only be the beginning


Cover of Shonen Jump with Luffy singing from One Piece.

The success of One Piece Odyssey wouldn’t just profit A play Fans. Although many licensed Shonen Jump games released over the years are challenging, their uniqueness still holds some value. In a modern era full of arena fighters and other action games, there should be at least some extra variety in the space. Looks like Bandai Namco is starting to realize this, giving the green light to non-standard games like Dragon Ball: The Breakers and One Piece Odyssey instead of standard fighting games. OdysseyThe success of as a AAA JRPG would send a strong message to Bandai and other companies that such games are still capable of turning a profit.


Although it is unrealistic to expect a Shonen Jump game release with various experiences similar to Naruto: Rise of a Ninja, more RPGs will mix things up and appeal to a different audience. There’s plenty of space in the market right now for more big-name JRPGs, especially turn-based ones. While mainstream fans might be hesitant, they might find an attachment to the licenses used in quality JRPGs like some fighting game fans have with Dragon Ball Fighter Z. All in all, it’s refreshing to see a major A play The title takes a crack at the RPG genre, and getting more anime licenses to get on board the genre would be the ideal outcome.

One Piece Odyssey will be released in 2022 on PC, PS4, PS5 and Xbox Series X/S.

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